Tips For Imaginative Educators #18: Introduce General Theories & Anomalies

What does every theory have?  An anomaly. What’s more, it’s the anomalous nature of theory that generates learning and deep understanding for the philosophic thinker. (Are you new to the Tools of Imagination series? Get the whole set here. FYI: Tips #1-7 are fantastic with our youngest students, Tips #8-15 work very well for students from elementary through […]

Tips For Imaginative Educators #17: Employ a Meta-Narrative Structure

Story-Telling For Philosophic Thinkers If you’ve been following the TOOLS OF IMAGINATION SERIES you’ll know that there are many different tools we can employ with curricula to engage students. While these tools differ one from the other, a common thread connects them all. Every “cognitive tool” described—whether one that comes with the body, oral language, written […]

Tips For Imaginative Educators #16: Take Them Out of This World

The Lure of Abstraction It can be intoxicating to realize that a whole world of abstract ideas exists that can explain and help us interpret the world of our daily lives. If supported in thinking in theoretical ways, many of our senior students/adult learners quickly and thoroughly take to the powerful understanding of the world […]

One Theme For The Entire Year?

Engaging The Philosophic Imagination:  Concept-Centered Teaching By Marlene Roseboom Since completing my studies in Imaginative Education (IE) some years back, I keep refining my curriculum to try to more effectively engage my students’ imaginations. This includes English 10, a course I have taught for several years. While I have already incorporated several separate IE units […]