Of Frogs and Fishes – Understanding Inquiry as a Pedagogical Method

By Rebecca Roman (with contributing edits by Dr. Tim Waddington)   I’m seven years old, playing in a shallow stream at the park. I’m about up to my knees and trying to catch frogs. I finally catch one, looking at its legs, touching its skin and hearing its plaintive cry. Rrrriiibit! My mom tells me to […]

Dodging the Fall of Constantinople – Connecting Physical Education and Social Studies

Authors: Leah Tesan and Dr. Tim Waddington By now, Imaginative Education has well established this simple truism: at the core of any great lesson is an abundance of student engagement. An inquiry-based curriculum, such as those found in British Columbia, Ontario and a growing number of other educational contexts, provides teachers with the opportunity to […]

King William I, The Conqueror…Of Great Writing!

By Tim Waddington One of the more vexing challenges in Social Studies education is teaching children how to write, you know, well. This post intends to support your thinking about what works, doesn’t work, and cannot work. In many lessons with a focus on writing, including those I abashedly confess are mine, one regularly sees the […]

The Uses And Abuses Of “Constructivism” As A Pedagogical Concept

By Tim Waddington What’s in word? Quite a lot, it turns out. Sometime during the spring of 1597, William Shakespeare ironically stuffed the phrase “a rose by any other name would smell as sweet” into the hopelessly smitten and abundantly naïve mouth of fair Juliet, thereby expressing the latter’s rather convenient indifference to her Romeo’s […]