There Is No Reason To Paint: The Human Obsession With Art (Middle/Highschool Teaching)

The Most Expensive Painting In The World Say the name Leonardo da Vinci to students over the age of ten here in Canada and many of them will know to whom you are referring. You may have to remind some of them that you are not referring to a certain Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle, but […]

King William I, The Conqueror…Of Great Writing!

By Tim Waddington One of the more vexing challenges in Social Studies education is teaching children how to write, you know, well. This post intends to support your thinking about what works, doesn’t work, and cannot work. In many lessons with a focus on writing, including those I abashedly confess are mine, one regularly sees the […]

The Place Of Wildness And Wonder In Critical Thinking

By Ira Rabois What is critical thinking? One element of critical thinking that most everyone agrees on is “higher order thinking,” which includes evaluating the appropriateness of evidence, the truth of propositions, and the soundness of arguments. But is this enough? I think you need to add imagination, mindfulness and empathy, and to think of critical […]

A Better Way To Teach History

By Robin Ulster and James Denby (IdeaDriven.org) Those of us who teach history are, in a sense, magicians. We dedicate ourselves to conjuring and bringing to life events from the past – at times thousands of years old. The tools of our conjuring act are traditionally books, some websites, and the occasional movie or song. Oh, […]

Tips For Imaginative Educators #17: Employ a Meta-Narrative Structure

Story-Telling For Philosophic Thinkers If you’ve been following the TOOLS OF IMAGINATION SERIES you’ll know that there are many different tools we can employ with curricula to engage students. While these tools differ one from the other, a common thread connects them all. Every “cognitive tool” described—whether one that comes with the body, oral language, written […]