#185DaysOfWalks

By Bela Luis (Grade 1/2 Multi-age Teacher, MEd student in Outdoor Learning) In the spring of 2017, I visited a small school named Brandt Argyle, just north of Winnipeg, Canada. I took many lessons away from that visit, but the one that resonated with me most was that of their daily morning walks. I decided […]

Taking Baby Steps With The Walking Curriculum

By Lana Steiner (Middle years Math educator, MEd student in Math Education) I truly believe changing one’s teaching practice should be evolutionary, not revolutionary. What I mean by that is that several smaller actions over time have a more profound effect upon one’s overall teaching practice than sporadic large-scale changes. One reason why I believe […]

Naturally Inspired, Imaginative Writing: The Walking Curriculum & Intermediate Students

By Darcie Booth (Grade 5 Teacher/MEd Student in Imaginative Education) Why should intermediate teachers use the Walking Curriculum (Judson, 2018)? Simply stated, it emotionally connects your students to their natural surroundings and awakens their imaginations. The Walking Curriculum can inspire, improve and increase written output for your students’ creative writing. As a Grade 5 classroom […]

Cultivating Imagination And Creativity Through A Lifewide Curriculum

By Norman Jackson In this earlier post on imaginED I introduced the idea of lifewide learning and how such an inclusive concept of learning could be encouraged, supported and recognized through a lifewide curriculum. It is interesting to note that this concept emerged from the work I was doing in the early 2000’s to develop understandings […]

Exploring Teacher Professionalism…Outside (The Walking Curriculum Strikes Again!)

Since The Walking Curriculum: Evoking Imagination & Developing Sense of Place (K-12) was published earlier this year, I’ve enjoyed learning about how educators are using the concepts with their students. The common denominator is this: Imagination- and inquiry-focused walking-based activities are radically changing the learning context for students. (If you happen to be on Twitter, […]